Common Errors Made by Youth Baseball Coaches

Cohasset Youth Baseball and Softball Association
Image: cybsa.net

Prior to joining Granite Point Capital as a partner in 2018, Scott Bushley served in varying capacities at BNY Mellon Investment Management where, among other accomplishments, he established its Global Financial Institutions Group and built the operational framework for its Global Partnered Solutions team. Beyond his pursuits in the financial sector, Scott Bushley is a volunteer youth baseball coach.

Coaching youth baseball or any other sport can be a rewarding experience, but there are several things one should and shouldn’t do to ensure that players are engaged, having fun, and improving their abilities. One of the more common mistakes a coach can make is forgetting that the sport should be fun, especially for younger players. This doesn’t mean that winning shouldn’t be the goal; rather, it should be a by-product of a competitive-yet-fun atmosphere in which coaches stress, recognize, and reward improvement.

Another common mistake made by youth baseball coaches is focusing too much on instruction. Generally speaking, kids have short attention spans and benefit more from learning drills on the fly than from being taught how to do them in drawn out talks. Moreover, drills should be divided into small group stations when additional supervision is available. This ensures that players are making the most of their practice time and are not standing around with nothing to do.

For coaches, one of the most important qualities is being open to learning. Oftentimes, a coach can make the mistake of thinking he or she knows all there is to know about a particular sport. Conversely, the best coaches are usually students of the game who seek out ways to improve their own abilities.

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Community Support Opportunities for Carroll School Graduate Students

Boston College’s Carroll School of Management
Image: bc.edu

Drawing upon more than 20 years of investment management experience, Scott Bushley serves as a partner responsible for finances and operations at the Boston, Massachusetts-based hedge fund Granite Point Capital. Earlier in his career, while working as an analyst at Atlantic Trust, Scott Bushley completed an MBA in finance at Boston College’s Carroll School of Management.

In line with Boston College’s Jesuit heritage, students at its Carroll School of Management are required to give back to the community through volunteering at nonprofits, mentoring young people, or by other means. During the 2017–2018 academic year, more than 900 graduate students contributed in excess of 6,300 hours of volunteer service. This was achieved, in part, through the school’s eight student-run clubs and organizations.

One of those clubs is Net Impact. Through this organization, students glean valuable insights as well as experience social entrepreneurship and corporate citizenship through job fairs and conferences. As part of the club’s community service efforts, students are paired with nonprofit organizations to conduct pro bono consulting work while gaining practical experience.

Another club is Invest ‘N Kids. This weekly tutoring program pairs Carroll students with young people from local middle schools.

Other groups include Graduate Women in Business and Stand Out at Carroll, the latter of which serves the school’s LGBTQ community.

Run Length Reduction Considered for 2020 Olympic Triathlon

Triathlon Photo by Victoire Joncheray on Unsplash
Triathlon Photo by Victoire Joncheray on Unsplash

The recipient of an MBA in finance from Boston College’s Carroll School of Management, Scott Bushley is an investment management professional who draws upon more than 20 years of relevant experience in his role as a partner at Granite Point Capital. Outside of his professional pursuits, Scott Bushley enjoys athletic endeavors like hiking, skiing, and biking. He has also completed several triathlons.

The triathlon event has been part of the Olympic program since the 2000 Sydney Games. The multi-sport event involves a 1,500-meter swim, a 40-kilometer bike ride, and 10-kilometer run, although this could change for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Officials are considering reducing the length of the run due to rising temperatures in the Asian country; more than 55 people in Japan were killed as a result of extreme temperature levels from late July to August 15, 2019.

Qualification for the triathlon event at the 2020 Olympics began on August 14, 2019, but due to expected temperatures in excess of 30 degrees Celsius and humidity of more than 82 percent, the 10-kilometer run was shortened to five kilometers. The International Triathlon Union (ITU) will review the qualifying event and determine if additional changes are required.

In addition to shortening the run distance, the ITU has already implemented earlier race start times, added extra water stations throughout the course, and revised heat stress protocols to combat extreme temperatures. The 2020 Tokyo Games will run from July 24 to August 9.