Tag Archives: Baseball

Little League Baseball Playing Field Dimension Requirements

 

Little League Baseball
Image: LittleLeagueBaseball.org

The recipient of an MBA with an emphasis in finance from Boston College’s Carroll Graduate School of Management, Scott Bushley held financial analyst roles with Sunflower Capital Partners and Atlantic Trust before joining BNY Mellon Investment Management in an executive capacity in 2007. Now a partner responsible for finance and business operations at Granite Point Capital, Scott Bushley enjoys coaching youth baseball in his free time.

To ensure competition is even across all levels and age groups, Little League Baseball employs a number of stringent rules and regulations. Playing field dimensions are of particular importance. For the Major division and below, the infield should be a 60-foot square, whereas the distance from home plate to the nearest fence or other obstruction between the two foul poles should be at least 200 feet.

From there, the pitcher’s mound should be 6 inches higher and 46 feet away from the back edge of home plate. There also should be at least 25 feet of open space between the fence and home plate as well as all base lines. Second base is required to be 84 feet and 10 inches in a straight line from home plate, while first base is 60 feet from home down the right side of the base line. Third base, meanwhile, should be measured 60 feet down the left side of the base line from home plate. The distance between first and third, then, should be the same as that from home to second (84 feet and 10 inches).

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Baseball’s Tag up Rule

Having gained investment analysis experience with Sunflower Capital Partners and Atlantic Trust, among other firms, Scott Bushley now serves as a partner responsible for finance and business operations with Granite Point Capital in Boston. Residing in the nearby community of Cohasset, Scott Bushley is the coordinator for Cohasset Major League and a volunteer baseball coach.

In baseball, the batter doesn’t have to record a hit in order to drive in a run. Runs can be generated via baseball’s tag-up rule that allows players on base to advance, provided they wait until after the ball has been caught. If a player leaves the base once the ball is struck, he or she will have to return to the base before making an attempt to advance to the next base.

For instance, a player on third base can score a run for his or her team by tagging up and advancing on a fly ball if there are less than two outs. In order to improve the chances of crossing home plate safely, the player should return to third base once the ball has been hit and determine, with assistance from the third-base coach, if it was hit deep enough to advance to home plate. Once the ball comes into contact with the outfielder’s glove, the runner should push off third base and sprint home to beat the relay throw.