Category Archives: Finance

How to Launch a Career in the Finance Sector with a Bachelor’s Degree

Graduation day Photo by Pixabay from Pexels
Graduation day Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

The recipient of a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Vanderbilt University, Scott Bushley is an experienced investment-management professional who serves as partner at Granite Point Capital in Boston. Scott Bushley began his career in 1997 as a sales and operations assistant at Deutsche Bank Securities after completing his bachelor’s degree, later entering Boston College’s Carroll Graduate School of Management.

While an MBA can be a significant asset for a career in finance, it isn’t absolutely required. Graduates of bachelor’s programs can make up for a relative lack of educational merits by pursuing internship opportunities and leveraging their background to demonstrate their qualifications.

Seeking out internship opportunities while in college, between academic years, and even after graduating, can be beneficial. Many finance internships are paid, so it’s better to obtain one with a respected firm rather than working at unrelated jobs. While completing the menial tasks often assigned to interns might not feel rewarding, working in a high-pace environment can provide networking opportunities and professional references.

Regarding background, those who fall into groups that haven’t been traditionally associated with the finance sector can benefit from internships or entry-level training programs. Deutsche Bank, for instance, has an internship program that prefers military veterans or LGBTQ applicants, while Morgan Stanley offers a Black, Hispanic, and Native American Early Insights Program.

Another thing to consider is elective courses. Even if pursuing a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated subject, aiming to complete multiple numbers-oriented courses like applied mathematics or economics can be applicable. A knowledge of engineering or science can be useful for prospective research analysts or investment bankers who specialize in related industries.

Advertisements

CSOM’s MBA Programs Rise in U.S. News Rankings

Boston College’s Carroll School of Management
Image: bc.edu

As a partner of Granite Point Capital, Scott Bushley provides counsel to the hedge fund’s managing partner on all operational matters, including human resources, IT, and office infrastructure. In addition to more than 20 years of relevant experience to support his efforts in this regard, Scott Bushley holds an MBA from Boston College’s Carroll School of Management (CSOM).

In March, U.S. News & World Report released its Best Graduate Schools list, where CSOM’s part-time and full-time MBA programs ranked 28th and 43rd, respectively. It was the second consecutive year that CSOM’s part-time program was ranked among the top 30, while its full-time program jumped five spots from last year’s rankings. Moreover, CSOM’s MBA programs in finance and marketing ranked 23rd and 25th in the nation, respectively, while its MBA program in accounting jumped four spots to No. 31.

A total of 475 schools offering MBA programs were surveyed. Rankings were based on a methodology involving factors such as job placement rates, starting salaries, average undergraduate GPAs, and peer assessments.

CSOM’s part-time MBA program, in particular, has performed well in numerous surveys. Just two years ago, U.S. News & World Report ranked it as the 46th best part-time program in the country. Its ascent can be attributed to its 2016 strategic plan, which emphasized making graduate programs at Boston College more competitive with a substantial curricular overhaul.

Long-Short Investment Funds – Trading and Selling to Minimize Risk

 

Long-Short Investment Funds
Image: investopedia.com

Engaging as a partner with Boston-based Granite Point Capital, Scott Bushley guides the financial and operational activities of a hedge fund that provides diversified financial solutions. A fundamental approach of Scott Bushley’s firm is employing long-short investment strategies, with a focus on US companies that are mispriced in the markets.

Long-short funds are a specific type of hedge fund that focus on long positions in undervalued investments expected to increase in value. The invested equity is also employed as margin in opening a short position, which involves selling securities that are not owned.

The cash received from shorting the assets is placed into further long positions, such that the investment dollars at hand are leveraged. It also provides the fund manager with extra breadth in analyzing complex situations and tailoring approaches to exact market dynamics.

Another advantage of the long-short fund approach is that it is market neutral. Through selling and buying, the fund manager can avoid overexposure in volatile situations where upward and downward swings are common. Although this helps minimize risk for the investor, it can limit short-term returns to some extent.