Tag Archives: Scott Bushley

A Brief Description of the Evolution of Triathlon

Experienced finance professional R. Scott Bushley earned his MBA in finance at Boston College’s Carroll School of Management. Scott Bushley serves as partner and COO of Granite Point Capital, where he performs fiscal and operational functions. Outside of work, Scott Bushley loves to participate in triathlons. So far, he has done over 25 triathlons and looks forward to doing more in the future.

A triathlon is an endurance sport that combines swimming, biking, and running in one event without a break between the sports. Throughout the world, over 3.5 million people participate in triathlon events each year. Here’s how triathlon has evolved over time.

The first-ever triathlon took place on September 25, 1974, in San Diego. Two avid runners, Dan Shanahan and Jack Johnstone developed the concept of a race that incorporates swimming, biking, and running. The event was known as the Mission Bay Triathlon. The race was held on Fiesta Island near Mission Bay. Forty-six people, each bringing their own bike, suited up for the inaugural event.

The Mission Bay Triathlon had a quite complicated format. The race started with a run, followed by biking, then swimming towards the mainland. Once there, the participants ran barefoot along the seashore before swimming again. The last leg was another run.

The order of the triathlon was fixed to swimming, biking, and running to avoid injuries. Swimming is risky, so the triathletes should start the race while still fresh. Since the risk of exhaustion-related mishaps is higher in biking than in running, it is best to put biking ahead of running.

The world’s most popular triathlon brand is the Iron Man. It was the idea of John and Judy Collins, who participated in the Mission Bay Triathlon. When they moved to Hawaii from San Diego, they developed the concept of an endurance race, later known as Iron Man. The first Hawaiian Iron Man was held on February 18, 1978. Iron Man became the ultimate test for triathletes so that each one who completes the race is called “Iron Man.”

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Basic Base Running Tips for Baseball and Softball

Based in Cohasset, Massachusetts, R. Scott Bushley is a partner focused on finances and operations at Granite Point Capital in Boston. When he is not overseeing the firm’s finance and business operations, Scott Bushley spends time as a baseball coach and member of the Cohasset Youth Baseball and Softball Association board of directors.

Base running is a common element of baseball and softball that cannot be overlooked by coaches, particularly at the youth level. Certain elements of base running are hard and fast rules of the sport, while others are matters of etiquette or strategy.

An example of an important base running rule involves overrunning first base. In virtually any other instance, a runner who is tagged by the ball while not standing on a base is declared out. However, the rules permit players to continue running beyond first base without risk of being tagged out, so long as they quickly turn around and head back to the base. Players do not have to turn into foul territory, but if they make any attempt to progress to second base, they are no longer safe.

From a coaching perspective, the first base rule is a good opportunity to encourage players to try their hardest and attempt to outrun a throw. This is not only a lesson in sportsmanship, but also it’s a strategic decision, as forcing a quick throw to first can result in an error.

A similar element of base running strategy involves sliding into the home plate. At the youth level, there is no rule stating that a player must slide into home. However, youth coaches often instruct players to slide into home whenever there is even a remote chance that there might be a play at the plate so that runners stay in the habit of sliding to avoid contact with the catcher.

The CYBSA’s Planned Upgrades and Improvements

Formerly serving as the head of business operations at BNY Mellon Investment Management, Scott Bushley has worked as a partner at Granite Point Capital since September 2018. Outside of his professional endeavors, Scott Bushley serves as the coordinator of the Cohasset Major League and as a member of the board of directors of the Cohasset Youth Baseball and Softball Association (CYBSA).

The CYBSA has been making slight improvements to baseball and softball fields in Cohasset in recent years with assistance from the Community Preservation Committee, and the organization is now seeking to implement larger upgrades. Planned improvements include expansions to the pitching and practice spaces, equipment storage enhancement, snack shack maintenance, and the establishment of development programs for player safety purposes. To raise money for these improvements, the organization planned to host its first fundraiser in a decade in October 2019.

CYBSA president Darrin Souza noted the need to move forward with these projects has been expedited due in part to the growth of youth softball and baseball. Softball, in particular, has become more popular in the region, and CYBSA has noticed steady growth in registration numbers. More than 400 boys and girls between the ages of 4 and 15 play in CYBSA leagues every year.

Choosing the Type of Triathlon That Meets Your Ability Level

A resident of Cohasset, Massachusetts, Scott Bushley serves as a partner at the Boston-based hedge fund Granite Point Capital. Actively involved in his community, Scott Bushley has been a volunteer baseball coach for six years, and has also completed more than 25 races and triathlons.

Participating in a triathlon is an exhilarating and challenging experience. The sport has increased in popularity in recent years, with more than two million people participating in triathlons annually. Preparing for a triathlon requires a well-designed training plan to improve your running, cycling, and swimming performance. Before drafting a training plan, it helps to know which length of triathlon you will race.

A good option for people new to triathlons is the sprint distance, which is typically a total of 16 miles. The individual components of a sprint triathlon are usually a 0.5-mile swim, 12.4 miles of biking, and 3.1 miles of running.

In contrast, an Olympic-distance triathlon consists of a 0.93-mile swimming portion, a 24.8-mile biking portion, and a 6.2-mile running portion. Even more challenging is the half Ironman competition, which includes a 1.2-mile swimming portion, a 56-mile biking portion, and a 13.1-mile running portion. The full Ironman competition doubles all of the distances in a half Ironman. Whichever distance race you choose, make sure your training plan sets appropriate goals to achieve adequate endurance.