Pitch Count Recommendations for Young Pitchers

As a partner of finance and operations at Granite Point Capital, Scott Bushley is tasked with providing strategic direction to operating functions and providing counsel to the managing partner on the scope of all firm operations. Outside of his work responsibilities, Scott Bushley is a volunteer youth baseball coach.

Pitchers play crucial roles on baseball teams, but are susceptible to arm injuries due to the stress they undergo with every pitch. While there isn’t a consensus as to when young players should start pitching, Major League Baseball’s Pitch Smart guidelines insist that players younger than 8 years old shouldn’t exceed 50 pitches in a single game. Little League, meanwhile, suggests kids shouldn’t start pitching until 9 years old.

USA Baseball has specific pitch count limits and rest time for different ages. According to USA Baseball policy, kids aged 7 and 8 should throw no more than 40 pitches in a game. If they exceed this number, they shouldn’t pitch again for at least two days. They can pitch the following day if they threw fewer than 20 pitches the day prior. Kids who are 13 and 14 can throw as many as 75 pitches in a single game, but shouldn’t pitch again for at least four days if they reach that mark.

How Hiking Can Improve Mental Health and Wellness

As a partner at Granite Point Capital, Scott Bushley leverages more than 20 years of experience to manage business functions and solve operational issues as they arise. Away from work, Scott Bushley enjoys skiing, biking, and hiking.

Beyond its physical benefits as a form of exercise, hiking can significantly improve mental health and well-being, as highlighted by numerous studies. A recent one, for example, found that after 90 minutes of walking in a natural environment, people prone to negative thoughts experienced fewer of them and had reduced neural activity in the part of the brain associated with mental illness.

Researchers have also linked aerobic exercises such as hiking to improved cognitive ability and memory. Hiking has been shown to boost brain power and may improve creative problem-solving and lower anxiety. Additionally, a study conducted by David L. Strayer from the University of Utah and Ruth Ann Atchley from the University of Kansas found that individuals who were prohibited from using technology during a four-day backpacking trip demonstrated increased problem-solving abilities by 50 percent.